Democracy and Accountability

Democracy and Accountability

  • Move to proportional representation in provincial elections. A fairer system will encourage more citizens to vote and make sure government more accurately represents the people and the diversity of our communities. It will also demand party collaboration, encouraging consensus-building and compromise to create stronger, long-lasting policies.
  • Implement transparent rules for fair leaders’ debates. For example, any party that achieved 2% of the overall popular vote in the previous election and qualifies for provincial per vote funding, should automatically qualify to be represented in televised or streamed leaders’ debates.
  • Lower donation limits to $1000 per individual and campaign spending limits for political parties to $0.68 per elector.
  • Lower the provincial voting age to 16 (the age of high school civics classes and the time many young people start to pay taxes and drive automobiles) to engage youth earlier and to create lifelong voting habits.
  • Hold general elections on the weekend.
  • Increase the availability of advanced voting.
  • Enforce strict accessibility standards at voting places to ensure that those with physical disabilities or other mobility issues are able to vote without barriers.
  • Ensure the integrity of elections with strict rules and regulations for online voting, provincially and municipally.
  • Increase the number of mobile polls at hospitals and residences for seniors and people living with disabilities that make it difficult to leave their home.
  • Provide an online report card of MPPs voting record. This would include a link to each motion with an easy to understand summary, prepared by an independent officer of the legislature to ensure it is unbiased and non-partisan.
  • Oppose “whipped vote”. MPPs should not be allowed to be expelled from a party or face other consequences for not voting with party lines on non-confidence motions.
  • Extend the right to vote in municipal and provincial elections to permanent residents so that they, too, can have a say in how their tax dollars are spent.
  • Increase the number of regular public forums where constituents can speak to their MPPs to improve the quality and quantity of public input in government decision making.
  • Allow the introduction of electronic petitions to the Ontario Legislature.
  • Create a Citizens Institute that will help train citizens to intervene in government processes, such as lobbying, speaking to committees and participating in formal proceedings like the Environmental Bill of Rights. This would provide training and resources to qualifying community-led initiatives and be funded by an increase in the lobbyist registration fee.